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Caking SA’s Culinary History Part Two

Caking SA’s Culinary History Part Two

Welcome back Cake Lover. We hope you took our advice and had a few exceptional cake moments during the past week. Are you sitting comfortably with a cuppa?  Maybe you kept a delicious little mini cheesecake aside to enjoy while you continue our culinary read …

We all think fusion food as something new. Not so. Way back in 1658 Malay slaves were imported to South Africa by the Dutch East India Company and with them came their cooking skills and their amazing use of aromatic spices. Locally available ingredients, European style of cooking and spices from the Far East equals the delectable Cape Dutch cuisine we know today.  We can offer you fusion flavours in our Peppermint Caramel Tart – a traditional South African tart made with love and a whole lot more! Here’s an idea – why not Indulge in a proudly South African fashion this coming Heritage Day with our Peppermint Caramel Tart –place your CakeAway ahead of time so that you don’t miss out on this cake experience!



A history of South African cuisine would not be complete without including the huge influence brought to this country by the French Huguenots.  Not only did they change the way that food was served from everything all at once to dishes served in a sequence of multiple courses, but they brought us wine. Our beautiful Cape vineyards owe much to this small group of settlers who brought with them their centuries old French wine-making traditions together with a collection of vines to start up their vineyards.  Imagine a candlelit dinner with a delicious glass of wine. Imagine pairing it with our Cape Malva Pudding made the traditional South African way using butter, fresh cream, apricot jam and a rich toffee sauce.  That deserves a capital YUM!

Don’t take for granted waking up in the morning to an English breakfast. The British brought us this pleasure as they did their culture of pies, roasts, carveries and puddings.  The Portuguese, who were the first Europeans to set foot on South African soil, brought us fiery hot chillies – think peri-peri prawns (with a very necessary soothing glass of iced water on the side).  We can soothe you too with a fresh-to-frozen cake from our online store.  No fuss, no bother – perfect for you to indulge in once defrosted.

Who doesn’t love a Durban curry?  Succulent, slow-cooked curries from our Indian communities who were brought to Natal (now Kwa-Zulu Natal) over two hundred years ago to establish the sugar cane plantations there. Many varieties of curries are blended and used in these popular and quite delicious dishes. 

Throughout South Africa’s history our rainbow nation has been on the move.  The Khoi and the San, the Bantu people migrating southward, the Great Trek, the difficult days of the Anglo Boer war.  Few provisions were the order of the day and cured, dried, salted and spiced meat was the best way to preserve it – biltong was born and is still with us today, thank goodness, as it is soooo delicious.  Of course, one pot meals were prepared in the potjie pot, cuts of meat braaied over the open fire and home-baked pot bread are legacies from this era. Here’s another Heritage Day suggestion for you Cake Lover – a braai day with the family.

What a food journey we have been on. We hope you can share our secret of delicious hand-crafted cakes (and our blogs) with your lovely friends.  Remind them to pop into a Château Gâteaux  to make their choice from the feast of Cake Creations we have in store. Mmmm …

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Caking SA’s Culinary History - Part One

Caking SA’s Culinary History - Part One

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